sad girl sitting on moving box sad about moving to new home while parents talk behind her

It’s possible to move with children, but certain ages are more difficult than others.

While it’s a great idea to speak with your children before the move, you don’t want to be overly cautious, as it could cause anxiety. Most kids will adjust, but is it worth it to uproot their life for a new job?

What to Consider Before a Long-Distance Move With Children

Deciding whether or not to move is a difficult and personal decision, especially if your children are already settled in and making long-lasting friendships. 

sad girl sitting on moving box sad about moving to new home while parents talk behind her

Here are a few things to consider.

The Job Opportunity

First, consider the opportunity that the new job offers. Is it a significant step up in your career or a chance to work in a field that you’re passionate about? Is the job located where you’ve always wanted to live or visit? Or is the position the exact same, but you’re making more money?

If the latter is true, then it may be harder to justify a move. Keep in mind that the city you’re moving to could have a higher cost of living than your previous one, which may not make the move worth it. If you can find something similar in your current city, you should avoid moving.

The Financial Implications

It’s expensive to move to another state, whether you plan on packing yourself or hiring a moving company. In many cases, using a professional moving company is cheaper when you factor in time spent getting ready. Plus, many moving companies offer insurance on your belongings.

At 9Kilo, you can compare multiple long-distance relocation quotes from local companies, so you can find the best one for your budget.

However, make sure you also budget for the cost of packing materials, hotel stays, gas, closing costs, first and last month’s rent, and anything else.

The Impact on Your Spouse

If you’re moving with a spouse or partner, you should ask about their perspective. Even if the job checks all your boxes, your loved ones may feel nervous about the move. It’s vital to approach this topic with absolute seriousness, preferably while alone and after you’ve done your research. 

Your spouse’s or partner’s attitude will rub off on your children, especially when they’re older. At the same time, they have a right to be confused, anxious, or angry, as they’re also uprooting their own lives.

Make sure your spouse or partner agrees to move before talking with your kids.

The Support System

Consider the support system you and your family have in your current location, then compare it to what you’ll have in the new one. Will you have family or friends nearby to help with emotional support or childcare? Can you still keep in contact with the people you love in the new state?

Sometimes moving is absolutely necessary, but that doesn’t mean it’s a good idea to cut off all ties, especially for your children’s sake. If your finances allow it, try to travel back to your old location once a month. If you’re moving across the states, aim for quarterly or bi-annually.

The Mental Health Implications

No matter how well you prepare your child for the move, their mental health will take a hit. The degree to which it affects your children is up to how you and the adults in your life tackle the move and moving topics. This isn’t to make parents feel guilty but to make them aware.

Children with unstable focusing often have lower life satisfaction, fewer quality relationships, and a lower sense of personal well-being.

To make the transition easier, parents can involve their children in moving decisions, make a memory book, and throw a goodbye party.